Print

A

Artisan Details

Artisan Details

Pintucks, pleats, ruffles, rosettes. Details adorning some of today's newest styles are adding charm to classic cardigans, tops, shoes and more.
Audrey Fabric

Audrey Fabric

Inspired by the classic movie icon herself, this fabric is a cleverly woven two-way stretch fabric that provides a pulled-together look for casual silhouettes like capris, cropped pants and ankle pants.

B

Bermuda Shorts

Bermuda Shorts

Originating with the British Army during the 2nd World War and becoming popular in Bermuda soon after, Bermuda shorts have a tailored fit and hit just one inch above the knee with or without cuffs.
Bootcut

Bootcut

Literally, the jean's leg is designed to accommodate a boot. It's wider than a straight leg, but more narrow than a flare leg.
Boyfriend Cardigan

Boyfriend Cardigan

Inspired by him, made feminine by her. Our boyfriend cardigan is perfectly oversized for a longer hemline, yet still tailored for a streamlined silhouette.
Boyfriend Fit

Boyfriend Fit

Jeans for women designed to fit more loose like men's jeans. The jean evolved from the concept that girlfriends would raid their boyfriend's closets, borrowing their comfortable, worn-in jeans. This fit offers a laid-back casual look unlike any other style of denim jeans.

C

Camp shirt

Camp shirt

A casual button-front look meant to be worn untucked and often used as a light layer. A warm-weather favorite, especially in linen!
Capris

Capris

Though named for an Italian isle in 1948 by European designer Sonja de Lennart, these warm-weather essentials became popular stateside via appearances in U.S. film and television (Roman Holiday; The Dick Van Dyke Show). Today they're just as timeless, just as playful, just as chic.
Cardigan

Cardigan

A 17th-century fishermen favorite, the cardigan was named after the 7th Earl of Cardigan, who led the Charge of the Light Brigade. These days, no closet is complete without a stack of them - in every imaginable color and texture. Warm, comfortable, the ideal finishing piece.
Cashmere

Cashmere

Cashmere dates as far back as 3rd century BC, but became popular in the 1800s when Napoleon III gave his wife 17 of the finest cashmere wraps. Feather-light, ultra-luxurious, silken, cashmere makes its way into the weave of our plush cabled sweaters.
Chambray

Chambray

The original "blue collar" work shirt, chambray is a cotton fabric that feels like denim's softer sister.
Chino

Chino

First sold in the U.S. as military-issued pants, chino is a light, cool cotton twill that's found its place in fashion. Dressy enough for work, yet relaxed and easy.
Compact Crepe

Compact Crepe

This light, all-season fabric is wrinkle-resistant, with a subtly puckered surface and a flawlessly fluid drape. Popular for dresses and suiting.
Corduroy

Corduroy

An English fabric derived from the words cord and the obsolete duroy (meaning a coarse woolen fabric), corduroy was originally viewed as work wear because of its warmth and durability. Today, it's considered casual comfort and beloved in easygoing shirts, jackets and pants.

D

Denim Washes

Denim Washes

Derived from the French name "serge de Nimes," denim is a twill weave cotton fabric with different colored yarns in the warp and weft. The "wash" of a denim can refer to a range of things, from its production (prewashed to preshrink or garment-washed to affect the final "hand" or feel of the fabric) to its final look (stone wash, acid wash, and enzyme wash). Stone wash: the fabric is put through an industrial wash with stone (typically pumice) to give it a softer look and feel. Acid/enzyme wash: chemicals strip color off the surface of the fabric, giving it either a marbled (acid) or vintage (enzyme) look. Sometimes "wash" is a part of the color name to illustrate the colors' intensity.
Dolman sleeve

Dolman sleeve

From a Turkish word meaning 'robe,' a dolman sleeve is narrow at the wrist, widening at the point where the arm attaches to the garment.

E

Embroidery

Embroidery

Embroidery can be dated as far back as ancient Egypt and 5th century BC China. We've kept its classic simplicity, but also embellished here and there with metallic threading and beads of all sizes and shapes.
Espadrilles

Espadrilles

True classics, as stylish today as they were during their debut in 14th century Spain. The defining characteristic is its jute rope sole (now considered eco-friendly). Flat or wedge shape, tie-up or slip on, the espadrille's upper, usually made from cotton or canvas, has evolved into bold colors, stripes and patterns.

F

Faille

Faille

Popular in the 1950's for its beautiful drape on gowns, today faille has evolved into a tightly woven blend of cotton, rayon and silk with a slight ribbed texture. We love how faille maintains a graceful shape, tailors beautifully and is virtually wrinkle free for our dressier pieces.
Floral Patterns

Floral Patterns

Taking their cue from the floral-friendly 1950s, these pretty, vintage-inspired prints marry watercolor shades with brushstroke design. The resulting patterns capture the bright, light, charming feel of the season.
French Knot

French Knot

An embroidered, raised stitch that can be strung together on fabric to make interesting shapes (like on our wraps) or polka dots. Just another special detail that makes classic that more charming.

G

Glamourak

Glamourak

Take an anorak (a traditional hooded winter coat) and add a little Talbots flair. The result? The glamourak.

H

Hemp

Hemp

Its use dates back to the Stone Age. This natural fiber was used in making rope, nets and sacks. The fibers were prized for being strong and durable. Today, hemp is used in natural clothing and can be surprisingly soft to the touch.
Herringbone

Herringbone

This pattern is a variation on the twill weave. At regular intervals the twill weave is reversed, creating a zig-zag effect. It gets its name because the pattern resembles that of a herring fish skeleton. Its use is popular in suits and outerwear.

I

Irish Linen

Irish Linen

Once a mummifying wrap for Egyptian kings, linen became an industry in Ireland in the 17th century, under the guidance of an Earl and a Duke. Still noble in character, our crisp, cool linen hails from the ever-innovate Baird McNutt mill of Ballymena, established in 1912.

J

Jacquard

Jacquard

Brocade, damask and matelassť are three famous names of jacquard-woven fabrics. The jacquard is actually an attachment (named for its inventor) on the loom that gives the weaver control of the warp yarns. This attachment is capable of creating beautifully intricate designs woven into the fabric. Uses range from apparel to interior design.

L

Lady Jacket

Lady Jacket

Evolving from the French term "jacquette" that originally meant a man's morning coat or jacket of a lady's suit, "the lady jacket" has become a Talbots essential, an undeniably feminine finishing piece that artfully elevates everything from casual jeans and a tee, to refined trousers and a white shirt, and dressier evening options.
Lindsey Fabric

Lindsey Fabric

The best of both worlds - a refined smooth look and comfortable, move-with-you flexibility. Woven from a blend of polyester and viscose with a touch of spandex, it can be seen in our suiting separates as well as some of our more casual pants.

M

Mac Trench

Mac Trench

The cut of a classic Mackintosh jacket, perhaps the most-loved raincoat of all time, with the double-breasted, belted style of a trench. Looks so good, it will make you pray for rain.

O

Origami

Origami

Based on the Japanese folk art of paper folding that dates back to the 17th century AD, this intricate technique is adding a bit of unexpected charm to many of our styles including tops, sweaters and even shoes.

P

Paisley

Paisley

Originating from the Persian motif buta - meaning life and eternity, paisley carries on today with the dynamic energy, bright colors and steady rhythm of movement that it came to symbolize hundreds of years ago.
Peached twill

Peached twill

While not as fuzzy as the name implies, peached twill does have a subtle texture that comes from an abrading process. This also makes it softer-which we think is just peachy.
Pea Coat

Pea Coat

Originally worn by sailors in early 19th century European navies, the pea coat is that timeless piece in every modern wardrobe, oftentimes referred to as the 'Jackie O Jacket.' Ours still has that classic shape, but is updated in a range of colors and a striking herringbone weave.
Pencil Skirt

Pencil Skirt

Introduced in the 1950s as popular office wear, the pencil skirt nowadays is just as at home at a cocktail party or on a casual shopping trip. Its simple look has also evolved, now with brighter colors, textured fabrics and detailed embellishments.
Platform heels

Platform heels

Style goes to new heights when classic heels are paired with a subtle platform rise at the toes.
Polo Shirt

Polo Shirt

Lauded tennis champion, Renť Lacoste, improved upon the cumbersome tennis whites that slowed him down on the court. 75 years later, the polo gets reimagined again, this time with whimsical dragonfly embroidery and summery colors.

R

Ruana

Ruana

A wrap with an Irish heritage, the Ruana can be worn many ways. Traditionally secured with a pin or a broach.

S

Scarves

Scarves

Style idols Audrey, Grace and Jackie had much to do with elevating this versatile accessory to the iconic statement it remains today. In an array of colors and fabrics, its possibilities are endless: tied at the neck, around the waist, on a handbag, and, of course - worn as a head scarf.
Sheath Dress

Sheath Dress

Inspired by the 1950's version, this form-fitting silhouette follows the lines of the body. Designed with varying necklines, it's the ultimate feminine statement. It can be worn with or without a jacket or sweater and dressed up or down depending on accessories.
Shirtdress

Shirtdress

A favorite look borrowed from the boys that became popular in the 1960s after being seen on the runways for resort collections. Women, then and now, love the way it flatters the waist and gives great proportions to all sizes and shapes.
Statement Necklace

Statement Necklace

A bold, sometimes oversized piece that can vary in length and shape. It can even be more than one necklace. Beads or jewels, it's a true attention-getting piece that pulls an entire look together.
Straight Leg

Straight Leg

Literally, the leg of the jean or pant is straight from the knee to the ankle (does not tailor in like a slim leg or angle out like a boot cut, flare leg, wide leg or bell bottom).
Sweater Jacket

Sweater Jacket

Looks like a sweater, thinks like a jacket. And vice versa. This versatile wearable is the classic combination of sweater warmth and jacket construction, perfect for when outdoor weather falls between frightful and delightful.
Swing jacket

Swing jacket

A gently flared shape that widens toward the hem. Wear it open to put your favorite top in the spotlight.

T

Thinsulate

Thinsulate

A synthetic insulation used primarily in outerwear and cold-weather apparel as an alternative to polyester fill or down. It's a trademark of the 3M corporation and provides warmth without the weight (or bulk) of wearing winter layers.
Trench Coat

Trench Coat

The official raincoat first of British WWI officers, then to the fashion darlings of every generation - the 30s, 40s, 50s, right on through today - our modern trench lives a double life: as both sophisticated outerwear and sleek style statement.
Trouser

Trouser

First known use of the term dates back to 1681 and is a variation on the earlier term trouse, derived from the Scottish Gaelic triubhas. It's the garment worn on the lower part of the body, consisting of two legs, a fly and the waist. (Other details may include pockets, pleats, belt loops and even cuffs.) Typically worn in an office or other semi-formal settings. The trouser may be made of many types of materials, including lightweight denims (for casual Fridays).
Tunic

Tunic

Truly a girl's best friend, the tunic has roots in ancient Greece and Rome. Thousands of years later, it's become a style icon, known for its versatility, breadth of design, and unique ability to flatter every body type.
Tweed

Tweed

This famous weave's color and texture was first inspired by the landscape of Scottish Isles, Lewis and Harris, in the late 1800s. Today it's a Talbots tradition, re-imagined and inspired by you.
Twill

Twill

A basic, plain weave created by interlacing warp and filling yards to create a diagonal look on the surface (and on some twills also the back) of the fabric.
Twin Set

Twin Set

Originally inspired by sweater sets on golf courses in the early 1900s, we've taken our inherently charming pairing of the cardigan-and-matching-shell and reimagined them by fearlessly mixing patterns and colors with unexpected fabrics like chiffon.

U

Uncut Corduroy

Uncut Corduroy

A derivative of classic corduroy, but with a thick uncut pile as luxurious as velvet. We've worked this plush fabric into 'everywear', so soft in our casual pants and lady jackets.

V

Voile

Voile

A lightweight, plain-weave cotton fabric that takes its name from the French for "veil." A favorite for layering.

W

White Shirt

White Shirt

Crisp. Cool. Polished. Smart. And undeniably classic. A chic blank canvas to put your own signature on, our indispensable white shirt has been celebrating self-expression for decades. Dress it down, play it up, take it out.

Y

Yarn-dyed

Yarn-dyed

A way of creating lasting color in a garment by immersing the yarns in dye prior to being woven. The saturated color is deeper and richer than that achieved through other dyeing methods.